MORE GARDENS

BANK OF CANADA PLAZA GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Bank of Canada Plaza Garden (Bank of Canada Rooftop Terrasse Garden)

Location: exterior of Bank of Canada (corner of Bank St. and Wellington St.)

Address: 30 Bank St, Ottawa, ON K1A 0G9

Garden Promenade: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 11

Services for Visitors: Parking $ nearby/Street Parking – Washrooms in Bank of Canada Museum– Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Eating Areas

 

Description: The Bank invested significantly in public spaces as part the recent renewal of its head office. First is the reimagined and expanded Bank of Canada Museum, which is available free of charge to the general public and provides direct education through interactive exhibits, the National Currency Collection and other programming. The Museum is located underneath the east plaza of the facility and features an easy-to-spot entrance (in the shape of a pyramid) at the corner of Bank and Wellington streets.

The second is the Bank of Canada plaza itself, prominently located along the ceremonial and discovery route called “Confederation Boulevard.” The plaza was redesigned to improve accessibility, safety, and functional qualities. It now serves as a vibrant, outdoor presentation space – landscaped with bleacher-style seating and greenery – where residents, visitors, and Bank employees can gather and enjoy the outdoors. The plaza was originally built as part of the Bank’s renovations in the 1970s, under the direction of renowned architect Arthur Erickson. However, Erickson’s original vision for this outdoor space was never fully realized. The new iteration, completed by architectural firm Perkins + Will in 2016, was influenced by the Canada Pavilion designed by Erickson for the Osaka World Expo in 1970. The dark bronze metal and angled glass of the three pyramid structures is inspired by the glass towers of the Bank’s head office, while the green-black granite (sourced from Quebec) is a nod to Erickson’s original design for the plaza. Lastly, two glass columns add visual interest and night lighting.

 

 


CARLETON UNIVERSITY 

 

  • Nesbitt Greenhouses

 

Garden Name: Nesbitt Greenhouses

Location: H.H.J. Nesbitt Biology Building, Carleton University

Address: Carleton University – 125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa K1S 5B6

Garden Promenade Route: More Gardens

Garden Number: 6.1

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

 

Description: Carleton University has one of the best university greenhouse complexes in Canada. This facility is used for research, teaching and display to the general public. The greenhouses hold comprehensive plant collection of several thousand specimens ranging from popular crop species such as corn, soybean, papaya, banana and sugarcane to some quite unusual desert specimens. Welwitschia, usually found only in the Namib desert regions of South West Africa, resides in our own desert room.

Climate controlled display houses simulating tropical and temperate environments, 18 houses containing teaching and research material and a number of controlled environment chambers and rooms all make up approximately 10,000 square feet of a unique research, teaching and learning environment.

The Biology Department greenhouses were built in the late 1960s, and were designed with the help of Dr. John Webb, Dr. George Setterfield, Dr. Frank Wightman, and Hank Datema, who was curator of the greenhouses until his retirement in the fall of 1995. Originally, the facilities consisted of three display houses and 18 houses dedicated to teaching and research. When the Environmental Laboratories Biology Annex (ELBA) building was expanded, one of the display houses was removed.

The greenhouses provide its users with all the growing facilities and plant material required for research and teaching year-round. Undergraduate students are introduced to the greenhouses at the first year level and can continue to use the facilities in more advanced studies of plant morphology, biochemistry, biotechnology, physiology and plant/animal interactions, just to name a few.

The display houses are open to the public for self-guided tours (Monday to Friday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.). Garden plot facilities are also available and in use by various institutions

 

 

  • Kitiganensag Community Garden

 

Garden Name: Kitigànensag Community Garden

Location: north of Leeds House, beside Parking Lot P6, Carleton University

Address: Carleton University – 125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa K1S 5B6

Garden Promenade Route: More Gardens

Garden Number: 6.2

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

 

Description: The Graduate Students’ Association (GSA) runs this garden, located just north of Leeds House, beside Parking Lot P6.

The GSA also worked with the Aboriginal community – calling the garden Kitigànensag, meaning “Little Gardens.” The GSA is trying to work as allies with the Aboriginal community on campus. The campus falls on Algonquin territory.

Duncan Watt, vice-president (Finance and Administration) at Carleton, says the garden fits with the university’s desire to become a more sustainable organization.

“It’s a wonderful addition to the Carleton community,” said Watt. “In particular, I want to thank the GSA for their perseverance and for making this happen.”

MacNeil said the garden is open to all on campus, and students, faculty and staff can each grow and harvest their own plot. “We’d love to see more food growing on campus and promote (the garden) as a place for everyone.’’

 

 

  • Richcraft Hall Vertical Garden

 

Garden Name: Richcraft Hall Vertical Garden

Location: Richcraft Hall, Carleton University

Address: 9376 University Dr, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6

Garden Promenade Route: More Gardens

Garden Number: 6.3

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

 

Description: The living wall is located in the three story atrium of  Richcraft Hall (formerly the River building), overlooking the scenic Rideau River. The building has achieved a five out of five Green Globes rating for sustainable design. The wall can treat 5,725 cfm of air while beautifying the indoor space.

 

 


CHAR BAGH COURTYARD GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Char Bagh (Courtyard Garden)

Location: Aga Khan Foundation Canada Headquarters

Address: 199 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, ON K1N 1K6

Garden Promenade Route: Sussex Drive Garden Route

Garden Number: 3

Services for Visitors: Street Parking – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

https://www.akfc.ca/about-us/visit-us/book-your-tour/

 

Description: An interior courtyard at the Delegation of the Ismaili Imamat provides a modern interpretation of a char bagh, or four-part garden, drawn from historic Islamic landscape architecture in South and Central Asia. Landscaped for Canada’s four seasons, the garden is a peaceful sanctuary throughout the year. Plantings include boxwood hedges, Japanese lilac trees, and black scalloped ajugas, all of which create an interesting snowscape in winter. In keeping with His Highness the Aga Khan’s desire for openness and transparency within the Delegation building, the two ends of the garden enclosure are made of glass. The result is an unimpeded line of sight through the courtyard and building between Sussex Drive and Boteler Street.

Designed by award-winning architect Fumihiko Maki. The design emerges from the Aga Khan’s belief that architecture is not simply about buildings, but about the quality of life of those that inhabit the built environment. Home of the Char Bagh (courtyard garden).

Plan Your Visit

The Visitor Program provides the public with an opportunity to explore the Delegation through regularly scheduled tours, and admission is free. Volunteer guides will be on hand to facilitate open-house visits of the Atrium, the Resource Library, and, weather permitting, the Char Bagh (courtyard garden). Please plan on approximately 30 minutes for your visit.

The Visitor Program’s summer schedule is Saturdays from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. Please note that Visitor Program will be closed on Saturday June 29th for the Canada Day weekend.  

In special circumstances, it may be possible for guests to visit the building during business hours. Please fill out the inquiry form below to indicate your interest or leave a message by calling 1 (800) 267-2532 or (613) 237-2532 ext 7.  An AKFC representative will then be in contact with you.

 

 


GLOBAL CENTRE FOR PLURALISM: FORECOURT GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Global Centre for Pluralism Forecourt Garden

Location: Global Centre for Pluralism

Address: 330 Sussex Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 0C7

Garden Promenade Route: Sussex Drive Garden Route

Garden Number: 4

Services for Visitors: Street Parking nearby – Parking $ nearby

 

Description: The forecourt garden is an attractive, tranquil space and a unique and engaging urban garden experience. Trees and planters frame a diverse palette of durable and hardy plant species that provide fragrant blooms from early spring well into autumn.

The Centre is a partnership between the Government of Canada and His Highness the Aga Khan.  Inspired by Canada’s experience as a diverse and inclusive country, the Centre’s work advances global understanding of pluralism and positive responses to the challenge of living peacefully and productively together in diverse societies.

The Centre defines pluralism as a set of values and actions, founded on respect for diversity, which support and sustain inclusive societies.  In pluralist societies, choices are made to ensure the full participation of all people in political, economic and socio-cultural life.

 

 


JEANNE D’ARC COURTYARD GARDENS

 

Garden Name: Jeanne D’Arc Courtyard Gardens

Location: behind Paper Papier, access through York St. and Clarence St., ByWard Market

Address: 18 Clarence St, Ottawa, ON K1N 5M4

Garden Promenade Route: Sussex Drive Garden Route

Garden Number: 7

Services for Visitors: Street Parking nearby – Parking $ nearby

 

Description: This peaceful urban oasis of lush greenery and flowering plants in the courtyard provides a beautiful resting place and a beautiful backdrop for passersby to snap some memorable pics of Ottawa.

This Couryard is home to the Dancing Bear sculpture. Created by Pauta Saila, a Nunavut based artist, the bronze Dancing Bear sculpture was installed in 1999. A plaque on the wall of the condominium near the Paper Papier store includes the following description:

“Pauta Saila, an Inuit hunter, began carving in the 1950’s to supplement his livelihood. He is widely known for his powerful, somewhat abstract, dancing bears. His father was a legendary Inuit leader on Baffin Island, where Pauta grew up learning about the polar bear firsthand. In memory of Charles Jennings, one of the pioneers of Canadian broadcasting, and his wife Elizabeth Jennings. Donated by their family.”

In the spring, summer and fall seasons, the City places benches on the perimeter of the sculpture along with flowers and other plants making this a great place to sit and take a break from the day or read a book. Also, the fact that this courtyard is somewhat hidden from view and only open to the public from 7:30am to 11pm daily make this a very special place.

 

 

 


JIM FLAHERTY BUILDING VERTICAL GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Jim Flaherty Building Vertical Garden

Location: Jim Flaherty Building (James Michael Flaherty Building)

Address: 90 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON K1P 5E9

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 5

Services for Visitors: Street Parking nearby – Parking $ nearby

 

Description: In joint venture with national architectural firm Dialog, MCROBIE Architects + Interior Designers was the Prime Consulting Architect for development of crown-owned lands for a $250 million, 650,000 square foot, 17-storey federal office complex. Located on the Capital’s ceremonial route alongside national monuments and institutions, the landmark building boasts a myriad of features including a high-tech curtain-wall system, limestone cladding, granite lobby finishes and a two-storey high living wall. The street-level facades were designed to create inviting pedestrian environments accessible from three streets and contain mixed retail. The building also incorporated a wide range of sustainable design features earning its LEED Gold certification.

Completed in Oct. 2014, the building was named as the James Michael Flaherty Building in honor of the late finance minister and one of the longest-serving Ministers of Finance in Canada’s history.

 

 


MANULIFE GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Manulife Garden

Location: Manulife Place, corner of Metcalfe St. and Queen St.

Address: 55 Metcalfe St, Ottawa, ON K1A 1M5

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 6

Services for Visitors: Parking $

 

Description: Serene corner garden in the heart of downtown Ottawa. Beautifully tended plants as well as sculpture and benches for you to be able to sit down and enjoy this urban oasis.

 

 


NATIONAL GALLERY 

 

  • Taiga Garden – National Gallery

 

Garden Name: Taiga Garden

Location: National Gallery

Address: 380 Sussex Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9N4

Garden Promenade Route: Sussex Drive Garden Route

Garden Number: 5.1

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Child Friendly

 

Description: The garden spans the side of the National Gallery, from the building to St Patrick as it turns into the Alexandra bridge. A part of the garden can be seen from the street but most of it can’t.

Landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander created the National Gallery’s indoor and outdoor gardens. Her inspiration for the taiga garden came about because the group of seven first showed Canada the north with their paintings – for this garden, A.Y. Jackson’s painting “Terre Sauvage”, was the main one. Oberlander was also wanting to incorporate some of the plants that are found in the Canadian North, with its severe northern beauty and muted colours. Pines, grasses and native Dogwoods make up the plants in this garden. The results later earned awards, but the concepts seemed radical at the time, and required careful selling. “I had to fight for them, and enlighten them,” says Oberlander.

Because the National Gallery did not want any water features included in the garden, as the idea originally had, irises represent the water that would have been there. It features Rock that was excavated as well, while building the Gallery and the stone was washed by Oberlander herself. The pine trees are uniquely shaped as well, giving a nice quality to the space.

The Gallery and the Landscaping were opened in May 1988 and cost 122 million dollars to make happen. The design architect was Moshe Safdie

 

 

  • Sunken Garden – National Gallery

 

Garden Name: Sunken Garden

Location: National Gallery

Address: 380 Sussex Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9N4

Garden Promenade Route: Sussex Drive Garden Route

Garden Number: 5.2

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Café and Eating Areas

 

Description: On the northeast side, a sunken garden of 12 flowering crab-apple trees is surrounded by the living rock into which the building is set. There are vines on the walls as well, on the side of the wall (and stairs) which provides access to the garden. The public walkway next to the sunken garden leads to a path that zigzags up the hill toward Nepean Point.

The Crab-Apple trees are spaced in a nice way and are well maintained. They provide nice shade and visitors can walk underneath the canopy they create.

The Gallery and the Landscaping were opened in May 1988 and cost 122 million dollars to make happen. The design architect was Moshe Safdie

 

 

 

  • Fred & Elizabeth Fountain Garden Court

 

Garden Name: Fred & Elizabeth Fountain Garden Court

Location: National Gallery

Address: 380 Sussex Dr, Ottawa, ON K1N 9N4

Garden Promenade Route: Sussex Drive Garden Route

Garden Number: 5.3

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Café and Eating Areas

 

Description:  When the Gallery invited celebrated landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander to redesign its interior garden court, she didn’t hesitate. Oberlander, after all, was responsible for the institution’s original landscape design, inside and outside the building, when she worked with the building’s architect Moshe Safdie in the late 1980s.  “It was very exciting,” says Oberlander. “The idea was to have a garden based on the Canadian Shield.” The garden is fluid and organic, meant to evoke the iconic, pre-settlement Canadian landscape, as well as the Gallery’s stunning setting atop Nepean Point, overlooking the Ottawa River. It contains massive Canadian Shield limestone rocks that create an undulating topography, a gravel path that suggests a riverbed and a bed of greenery with ferns and orchids. “These rocks depict the escarpment that is our original landscape of Canada,” says Oberlander.

 

The garden court’s original purpose remains as it was: no revision required. It’s meant to be a calm, reflective space. “We have made a contemplative space for the 21st century,” Oberlander says. “It’s very green, it’s beautiful, it’s inviting, and it relates to the needs of the city dweller to have contact with nature.”

 

 

 


PERFORMANCE COURT 7TH FLOOR ROOFTOP GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Performance Court 7th Floor Rooftop Garden

Location: Performance Court Building

Address: 150 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON K2P 1L4

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 4

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Eating Areas

 

Description: The lobby of this building is named Winter Garden. It embraces the historic Grant House by cantilevering over top and features an almost three storey digital wall installation.

The digital wall offers an immersive and interactive experience for tenants and visitors, exploring the overlap between art and business. It features touch screens to encourage participant interaction as well as content designed in partnership with our tenants.

Also situated within the Winter Garden space are two elevators that lead tenants and visitors directly up to the 7th floor roof top terrace where they can enjoy panoramic views of the city. This rooftop garden also includes a container garden where the restaurant Bekta grows its herbs.

Leading from the Winter Garden is a gallery space – Âjagemȏ – Algonquin word for “crossroads”. Discover this exhibition hall, at the home of the Canada Council for the Arts, its name honours its location on Algonquin land and the power of art to connect people. Exhibitions feature contemporary Canadian art, including work from the collections of the Canada Council Art Bank.

 

 


PLACE AUBRY CONTAINER GARDENS

 

Garden Name: Place Aubry Container Gardens

Location: Place Aubry

Address:  3 Kent Street, Gatineau, QC J8X 3J8

Garden Promenade Route: Downtown Gatineau Garden Route

Garden Number: 7

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Eating Areas

 

Description: Located in the heart of Old Hull, this magnificent pedestrian street lined with restaurants, bars and cafés boasts several heritage buildings. Among them is Aubry House, a historic monument built in the Queen Anne style.

Built in the aftermath of the 1900 fire, the surrounding heritage buildings reflect the diversity of architectural influences: some middle-class residences, including the Aubry House built in 1907, follow Victorian eclecticism, then fashionable and highly prized. well-off people.

Built in 1927, the technical school, today the Jules-Desbiens building, is an example of Beaux-arts architecture. In addition, there are many examples of match houses in the area, characteristic of the downtown landscape.

There are also two-and-a-half-storey houses with red brick facades and ornamental cornices, such as the café Aux Quatre Jeudis, formerly the Laflèche grocery store. All the buildings bear witness to the great diversity of the old sector of Hull. Aubry Square is part of the Kent-Aubry-Wright Heritage Site established in 1991. It became a heritage site in 2012.

 

 

 


ROBERT LEGET PARK CHILDREN’S GARDEN/OTTAWA CHILDREN’S GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Ottawa Children’s Garden

Location: Robert F. Legget Park

Address: Main Street, Ottawa ON K1S (at Clegg Street)

Garden Promenade Route: More Gardens

Garden Number: 4

 

Description:

  • Started in 2008, this garden focused specifically on programming with children and runs as communal garden plots, where everyone shares tasks and shares the harvest
  • Related to kids: A key partner with the Community Gardening Network is Canadian Organic Growers and their two programs: Growing Up Organic, which animates garden education at elementary schools and Senior Organic Gardeners, focused on getting seniors to engage and share their gardening knowledge.

 

 

 


RUISSEAU DE LA BRASSERIE GARDENS (BREWERY CREEK GARDENS)

 

Garden Name: Jardins du Ruisseau de la Brasserie Gardens (Brewery Creek Gardens)

Location: Sentier du Ruisseau de la Brasserie

Address: 69 Montcalm Street, Gatineau QC J8X 2L5

Garden Promenade Route: Downtown Gatineau Garden Route

Garden Number: 4

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Eating Areas

 

Description:

Description: The initial hub for the industrial development of Hull, this stream retains a unique architecture, preserved by its inhabitants and features opulent residences, public artwork and gardens marking different points in the origins of the city and region.

Brewery Creek is a small creek that forms the northern and western shores of Île Hull. It circles the downtown of the Hull sector, of Gatineau, Quebec. It runs into the Ottawa River just west of downtown Hull. Running west of Montcalm Street, it turns east north of the highway, running up to Jacques Cartier Park where it rejoins the Ottawa River. Originally it was at the heart of Hull’s industrial sector, with several factories. This included several breweries, from which it gets its name. In the 1980s the area was refurbished by the National Capital Commission. The former water works on a small island in the creek became the Théâtre de l’Île and the Montcalm Street Bridge was replaced by the ornate Tour Eiffel Bridge. Its pollution removed; it has become a popular location for birders.

Photo source: Ville de Gatineau

 

 

 


 

SAIGON SQUARE GARDEN

 

Garden Name: Saigon Square Garden

Location: corner of Preston St. and Somerset St.

Address: 930 Somerset St W, Ottawa, ON K1R 6R9

Garden Promenade Route: More Gardens

Garden Number: 12

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly

 

Description: Saigon Square is a tiny little park at the south west corner of Preston St and Somerset St West, in front of the Plant Recreation Centre, which is also the western edge of Chinatown.  It was named in 2018 “in recognition of the contributions to the City of Ottawa by the Vietnamese refugees who came to Canada in search of freedom.”

There is a sizeable Vietnamese population in Ottawa, in part due to Project 4000, which was created by then-mayor, Marion Dewar, who in 1979 welcomed 4000 Vietnamese refugees to Ottawa through private sponsorship.

There is also a monument in the square that is “in memory of those who have lost their lives in the quest for freedom.” The monument was erected in 1995, before the square was named.

The monument is a reminder of the innocent victims of war (the statue is of a woman running barefoot while carrying a child). The plaque acknowledges the positive contributions that the refugees have made to the place that received them. The benevolence of those who helped the refugees is implied. And the monument and square symbolize both realism and hope.

 

 


SPARKS STREET CONTAINER GARDENS

Garden Name: Sparks Street Container Gardens

Location: Sparks Street

Address: 100 Sparks, Ottawa, ON K1P 5B7

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 9

Services for Visitors: Parking $ nearby – Washrooms nearby – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Café and Eating Areas

 

Description: Sparks Street, just a block from Parliament Hill, has been turned into a pedestrian mall. It’s lined with shops, restaurants–and in the summer, beautiful container gardens and hanging flower baskets.  

Combining heritage, history, commerce and culture. As North America’s first Pedestrian Promenade, Sparks Street has evolved significantly as a year-round pedestrian friendly destination with special events, boutique retail, dining, entertainment, arts and culture.

 


 

SUN LIFE FINANCIAL CENTRE BUILDINGS

Sun Life Financial Centre is situated in the heart of Ottawa’s downtown core at 50 O’Connor and 99 Bank Street. The two-tower complex is connected by a soaring atrium.

 

Garden Name: 99 Bank Vertical Garden

Location: Sun Life Financial Centre – Bank St. tower

Address: 99 Bank St, Ottawa, ON K1P 6B9

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 10.1

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

 

Garden Name: Atrium Garden

Location: Sun Life Financial Centre – joins the Bank St. and O’Connor St. towers

Address: 50 O’Connor St, Ottawa, ON K1P 6L2/99 Bank St, Ottawa, ON K1P 6B9

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 10.2

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

 

Description: It houses a beautiful, 65-foot-high, 10,000-square-foot glass atrium complete with waterfall and café seating. The SLFB has recently received the LEED for Existing Buildings Gold certification. This is one of the highest green building certifications attainable in Canada. Only 13 buildings in the country have received this prestigious designation.

 

 

Garden Name: 50 O’Connor Vertical Garden

Location: Sun Life Financial Centre – O’Connor St. tower

Address: 50 O’Connor St, Ottawa, ON K1P 6L2

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 10.3

Services for Visitors: Parking $ – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible

 

 

 


WORLD EXCHANGE PLAZA GARDEN

 

Garden Name: World Exchange Plaza Garden

Location: exterior of World Exchange Plaza (corner of Metcalfe St. and Queen St.)

Address: 45 O’Connor St., Ottawa, ON K1P 1A4

Garden Promenade Route: Miracle-Gro Downtown Ottawa Garden Route

Garden Number: 7

Services for Visitors: Parking $ (free on weekends) – Washrooms – Wheelchair Accessible – Child Friendly – Café and Eating Areas – Pay Phone

 

Description:  World Exchange Plaza is a premier office complex located in the heart of Ottawa’s downtown central business district, just steps from Parliament Hill. The complex measures nearly 700,000 square feet and is home to a range of business leaders. Comprised of two Class ‘A’ office towers, a multi-level retail concourse, outdoor amphitheater and plaza modeled after the Roman Colosseum, and an underground parking garage for 1,100 vehicles

 

 

 


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